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First Responders Turn To Yoga

in YD News

Via NowThis:
Here’s why first responders are turning to yoga to improve their performance on the job.

Yoga for First Responders (YFFR) was created by Olivia Kvitne, a yoga instructor and published journalist who first offered trauma­sensitive yoga and resiliency training to the Los Angeles Fire Department and Los Angeles Police Department after having worked with veterans and military.

For more, visit the YFFR website.

20 comments… add one
  • Robin

    Yoga is one of the best practices around the world. It keeps us fresh, active and tension free or you can say tension free. While doing yoga you might also need good quality clothes which I found on https://livesore.net/ I also got a discount after I purchased tank tops and shorts for yoga. Do check it, guys!

  • I love that first responders have found value in yoga too!
    So many people could benefit from starting a yoga practice, in my opinion. 🙂

    Hugs,
    Camilla
    http://northernfairytales.dk/en/

  • Yoga is something that peaces our mind out, keep on posting and sharing such things.

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  • Yoga is the holistic you can use it all the way ,it will definitely help to improve you life and then you can improve you work and help to others as well.

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  • Traumasensitive yoga for first responders is a great idea. It’s a stressful job and this can only benefit them.

    https://smartfitnessedge.com/start-high-intensity-interval-training-hiit/

    No doubt they also have to do intense training, and I believe yoga is a great way to recover and stretch.

  • Wow, Yoga is the best practice ever. I used to not understand but I met a guy who blew my mind with the explanation and also got to practice it. It clams you and you got to get in touch with your true self. Click here for more https://bit.ly/2XWJa8A

  • Thanks for sharing this article.It will be very helpful…
    Classic City Legal

  • Hahaha, very nice first the man took in the Picture. may we also start from this step?

  • great article thanks for sharing yoga information, keep sharing

  • I have tried to do yoga daily basis but I haven’t done because I have no good teacher who can teach me well about yoga.

  • Spread Your Wings Not Your Legs

    How do we know that a guided and heavily asana-based yoga practice of the kind depicted here actually corresponds to the unique challenges and infirmities suffered by first-responders? Has the relationship been studied formally? Is the yoga practiced actually tailored somehow to these specific conditions or it it a well-rounded but general asana practice that now includes first-responders?

    The list of conditions suffered by first responders in the video does not include the most important: sleep derpivation. It not only leads to long-term medical conditions but is leading in the short term to escalating numbers of traffic accidents caused by first responders. In addition, research studies have found that more than half of EMS personnel nationwide could be classified as “fatigued” based on their work schedules (compared to roughly 30% of the general population). Fatigued respondents in one survey were 1.9 times more likely than non-fatigued respondents to be injured on the job; 2.2 times more likely to commit a medical error or adverse event; and 3.6 times more likely to be involved in a safety-compromising behavior. The most common errors were protocol deviation, dropping patients and medication errors.

    There are forms of yoga — namely IRest or Yoga Nidra — that focus on inducing deep sleep that are currently used to relieve PTSD symptoms in veterans. After rigorous testing, the Pentagon has approved IRest as a Tier II treatment. for PTSD It is currently being used in some 20+ military centers or programs nationwide.

    Yoga Nidra involves NO ASANAS. Participants rest backwards in a heavily padded and supported sitting position that along with some initial prompting from your guide induces a semi-conscious state that is deeply relaxing and apparently relieves deep sources of trauma. For what it’s worth, these effects have actually been measured quantitatively.

    I mention this because I think there is an unfortunate tendency in yoga not to link specific yoga modalities — and even specific yoga postures and exercises — to specific treatment conditions. Have a problem with stress or flexibility? Well, take a neighborhood yoga class!

    In my own past practice I often found that an asana-based class did absolutely nothing for me in a circumstances where simple meditation — or a walk in the woods — would have provided much greater relief. Conversely, when I really need to move and breathe or actually need a cardio boost, a yoga nidra type class is the last thing I might benefit from.

    The interviewee mentions the need for first-responders to take breaks from their state of “hyper-vigilance.” They need to turn that state off. It could be that yoga of any kind helps, but for a truly exhausted EMS, asana-based yoga might simply add to their sense of physical exhaustion. Many EMS personnel need to get to a deep place relatively quickly and maximize the degree of psychic rest they receive. It also allows for more continuous quality sleep.

    How you integrate yogic practices into the ridiculous 18-24 hour work “shifts” of many first responders would be a challenge, I suspect. Would too much relaxation be a hindrance? EMS folks tend to go on automatic pilot and worry about the consequences later. Many EMS management folks are under pressure to show that they are doing SOMETHING about these issues, other than working their EMS folks to death. I wonder how much serious strategic planning and execution is going into these yoga interventions beyond someone posting an announcement: “Hey guys, this cute lady is coming over to teach us all yoga. Fall out!”

    was struck by the fact that the list of coinditions
    faced by these responders did not include the most impoirtant: sleep deprivation.

  • Nice post thanks for sharing

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